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Spoon Saving
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What do you do in your day-to-day to help you save spoons?
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  1. 1 year ago
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Grocery shopping has always been a huge cost for me. Usually I'd send my husband to do it but when he went to training for six months...I had to lol. I found a chain near me that let me order online and just pick up at the store. It's more expensive but oh is it worth it!

I stage trash cans around the places I spend the most time. Kitchen has one in a highish traffic area, the living room by the couch, under the craft table, in my bedroom, in my game roon. It helps keep things clean which saves spoons on stress.

I keep canned or frozen goods as backup for days I can't cook or go out to eat Cerial is awesome for this too

Disposable dinnerware. More trash but no dishes!

Those containers of already wet paper towels. Easy grab and wipe down

If I have the energy to cook, I'll usually do a bit of cleaning in the kitchen while waiting for things to heat up in the microwave or the water to boil.

Make big batches of food and freeze in meal-size portions. Great to grab and take to work for lunch. Or days you can't cook and you have a home-made meal (great for chili and spaghetti. Also love doing this for grilled chicken)

Magic Erasers are a godsend. You can use those suckers for anything! (just don't use them on your car)

Wash laundry and fold another day

I have a priority list of chores so when I do have the power to do my daily chores, I don't have to think about what needs doing and just do. Helps aleviate stress if you also get anxiety over decision making!
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  1. 1 year ago
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The most difficult, but also most effective way of saving spoons for me is to say "no". Sometimes it is hard, especially when it is my boss or my wife asking me to do something, but I have to do it. If I'm being requested to complete a task that isn't urgent and I know I don't have the energy to do now, I'll say so and then offer a later time that I believe I'll be better equipped to complete it. It means people have to wait on me, which isn't always easy for me to accept. I'm a people pleaser by nature and don't like to say no, but sometimes I have to in order to save enough spoons for the crucial stuff.

I also save spoons by being proactive about my scheduling. I have a pretty regular schedule for my chemo treatments, so I make sure to schedule meetings and activities for weeks when I am off treatment. I also leave easier work for the days I know I will feel drained from chemo and leave the harder stuff for days when I know I'll be more alert and comfortable.
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  1. 1 year ago
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Saying "no" is one of the most difficult things for me, too. I'm still learning to make that my first response, but it's not easy. Especially when it's "can you do another shift at work?" because not only do I want to help people out, I also really need the $$$. It's frustrating. But I'm recognizing that what I really need to do is take a better stock of my funds and find out how much work I can cut while still making ends meet, then cut a solid day from my working week asap. No more lollygagging about.

Keeping things clean is really important for my mental health as it keeps my stress down and lowers the risk of getting sick. But... that's also really difficult. Not the least because my significant other has not shown an ability to clean her dishes right after using them (but that's because she is overloaded and stressed as well). Like my doctor says: "The best thing for my health right now is to avoid being stressed." At which point I laugh like a madperson.

I'd say that the biggest and simplest lesson I've learned is to never put off until later what needs to be done now. Even if I'm feeling a bit tired or stressed today, tomorrow is frequently worse, and if I've put something off it just ends up piling up and becoming a nightmare (or, like remembering to stop and fill up my car with gas, becomes crucial at really inopportune times).
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  1. 1 year ago
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Since this is very much still a learning thing for me, unlike Kit who has so many ideas that are helpful, she's a true guru... I can only speak to what I realise in the here-and-now. And today I have to say it's organisation... Today I had a flat bike inner-tube, 3 mints, some Dutch schoolwork, 58 cents, and a used bandage on my person. Not great bartering material... My plight reminded me of how, in Ep 1. Obi Wan and Qui Gon are just so super cool about getting their respirators out their robes and swimming out to meet with Boss Nass... Then there is Luke using that Stormtrooper utility belt for the famous rope swing...?

I think everyone will need different things in their own personal spoon-saving Jedi utility belt, but I'm going to think some more about this, and maybe get some crap together that I no longer go anywhere without. Mine will include mints, and money. Steve's maybe a colouring book But my choices need to be flexible enough to be EVERYWHERE with me. I like to be out a lot. Sometimes in dresses, sometimes up trees, and sometimes in the city... It will need some serious consideration. Which I'll get round to... I imagine...

... Now where did I put my procrastinat-a-tron? Is it under this distract-a-bibble?
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DeboraJ
  1. 1 year ago
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Wow Kit!!! Thanks for the fab chronic illness lifehacks! I too order my groceries online from Smith's. My husband picks the order up and when he's out of town they deliver it to me for a small fee. I also make use of online sites like Amazon for things I would normally get at department stores and/or things like vitamins and pet supplies, books, housewares...wait, I can't remember the last time I went to a store to purchase anything in person. Oh well. It works.

I also identify with the not being able to say no situation...to the point that there's nobody in my life pushing me anymore but myself and I find I am the hardest person to tell no. And yes yes yes Locksley, the house must be neat as possible to keep the stress down. The constant pain leaves me in such a brain fog of dissociation that an unruly house can trigger an emotional meltdown faster than a snowflake melts on a summer sidewalk...and that level of stress is the WORST thing for any sort of chronic illness. But yes, it's also very hard to keep up with due to the chronic illness and sometimes causes one of those downward cycles.

Mostly what I do to help me save spoons is move slow. Like crazy slow. Like I've taken up the sloth as a symbol in my life to remind me that at this stage, the slower I move the longer I'll last. I'm talking slow down the body, the mind, the everything about me and just take my time as if each action was a sacred ritual to be observed with utmost concentration. This also helps me get through many tasks and take them from being tasks to being meditations which further remove me from the pain and discomfort. That's the best I have. You'd think I'd have more at this late stage in life, but I pushed it all way longer than I should have in general and I'm only just now realizing that I'm not 30-something anymore and it's time to slow the heck down.
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  1. 1 year ago
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... If we can learn from mistakes, here's one I learnt from today. I threw my spoons away on worry! Whee! Watch them fly!
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