Live Service for Memorial Day - 31st October 2013

  • Mark Anjuu
  • Mark Anjuu's Avatar Topic Author
  • Guest
22 Oct 2013 18:27 - 22 Oct 2013 18:29 #122265 by Mark Anjuu
There will be a Live Service for Memorial Day in Chat:
Thursday 31st October 2013 at 2100 UTC

(UK members please note that the clocks will have gone back, therefore this is at 9pm UK time).
All are welcome to attend and to reflect on those that have passed into the Force. There will be elements of pagan tradition in this celebration, as befitting the festival of Samhein (also held around this time of year).
Last edit: 22 Oct 2013 18:29 by Mark Anjuu.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Desolous
  • Desolous's Avatar
  • Guest
22 Oct 2013 18:52 #122268 by Desolous
forgive my bumpkin-osity, but what is this memorial day memorializing?

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
22 Oct 2013 19:15 #122270 by Alexandre Orion
Traditionally, Des, Samhein was a feast at a time when the veil between the world of the living and the afterlife - Summerland or otherwise - was its thinnest. Departed souls could come and join in the festivities. As such, at this time of year, we also may honour and remember those who have passed beyond the veil. ;)

Chaque homme a des devoirs envers l'homme en tant qu'homme.
~ Henri Bergson
File Attachment:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Jayden
  • Jayden 's Avatar
  • Guest
22 Oct 2013 19:57 #122272 by Jayden
This can be added to Pagan studies if you wish. I will not be able to be present at your live ceremony but I hope it is possible to view it after the fact. If so please let me know.

Samhain(pronounced "SAW-win" or "SAW-vane")

Hallowe'en has its origins in the British Isles. While the modern tradition of trick or treat developed in the U. S., it too is based on folk customs brought to this country with Irish immigrants after 1840. Since ancient times in Ireland, Scotland, and England, October 31st has been celebrated as a feast for the dead, and also the day that marks the new year. Mexico observes a Day of the Dead on this day, as do other world cultures. In Scotland, the Gaelic word "Samhain" means literally "summer's end."

This holiday is also known as All Hallows Eve ("hallow" means "sanctify") ; Hallowtide; Hallowmass; Hallows; The Day of the Dead; All Soul's Night; All Saints' Day (both on November 1st) .

For early Europeans, this time of the year marked the beginning of the cold, lean months to come; the flocks were brought in from the fields to live in sheds until spring. Some animals were slaughtered, and the meat preserved to provide food for winter. The last gathering of crops was known as "Harvest Home, " celebrated with fairs and festivals.

In addition to its agriculture significance, the ancient Celts also saw Samhain as a very spiritual time. Because October 31 lies exactly between the Autumnal Equinox and the Winter Solstice, it is theorized that ancient peoples, with their reliance on astrology, thought it was a very potent time for magic and communion with spirits. The "veil between the worlds" of the living and the dead was said to be at its thinnest on this day; so the dead were invited to return to feast with their loved ones; welcomed in from the cold, much as the animals were brought inside. Ancient customs range from placing food out for dead ancestors, to performing rituals for communicating with those who had passed over.

Communion with the dead was thought to be the work of witches and sorcerers, although the common folk thought nothing of it. Because the rise of the Church led to growing suspicion of the pagan ways of country dwellers, Samhain also became associated with witches, black cats ("familiars" or animal friends) , bats (night creatures) , ghosts and other "spooky" things...the stereotype of the old hag riding the broomstick is simply a caricature; fairy tales have exploited this image for centuries.

Divination of the future was also commonly practiced at this magically-potent time; since it was also the Celtic New Year, people focused on their desires for the coming year. Certain traditions, such as bobbing for apples, roasting nuts in the fire, and baking cakes which contained tokens of luck, are actually ancient methods of telling fortunes.

Jayden
...
/|\

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Mark Anjuu
  • Mark Anjuu's Avatar Topic Author
  • Guest
22 Oct 2013 20:16 #122275 by Mark Anjuu
Replied by Mark Anjuu on topic Live Service for Memorial Day - 31st October 2013
Thank you for your insights. Feel free to post them in the pagan section if you wish - I have previously created info on some of the sabbats but didn't get around to "complete the set" so would appreciate anything you may have to offer.

It should be easy for someone reading the information on Samhein to see why we have chosen to align Memorial Day with this date.

With regard to the service, a version of the sermon will be posted on the following Sunday. However a transcript of the service will not be available since those joining the celebration will be encouraged to share their personal insights. As such, the service is both public and private, open yet sacred.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Naya
  • Naya's Avatar
  • Guest
23 Oct 2013 03:38 #122321 by Naya
It's also the Witches New Year, but we're actually preparing for Beltane here in the Southern Hemisphere.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • isisinabi
  • isisinabi's Avatar
  • Guest
24 Oct 2013 01:45 #122466 by isisinabi
Because times always throw me off, and I don't know if my Googlefu is failing me, is this 9pm EST?

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
24 Oct 2013 11:41 #122493 by Alexandre Orion
No ... it isn't an American time zone. It is Universal Time Coordinates. Greenwich time, so it doesn't change.

The clock in the top centre of the TotJO is UTC. You can easily then calculate the difference with the hour where you are, then you'll know. For us, it is evening 10 p.m. in France) ; for the Americas, it usually falls in the afternoon. For may apprentice, Brenna, it is usually about 8 a.m. of the next day ...

I hope that helps.

:)

Chaque homme a des devoirs envers l'homme en tant qu'homme.
~ Henri Bergson
File Attachment:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Naya
  • Naya's Avatar
  • Guest
24 Oct 2013 12:05 #122494 by Naya
You can also use the World Clock to figure out what time it is in your time zone.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
24 Oct 2013 12:11 #122496 by Avalon

isisinabi wrote: Because times always throw me off, and I don't know if my Googlefu is failing me, is this 9pm EST?


Nope, for EST, you're looking at 5pm.

Not all those who wander are lost
Studies Journal | Personal Journal

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Moderators: Zero