This is sort of spontaneous, so please bear with me …

 

Several conversations with people both in and out of the TotJO this past week have brought up an interesting (to me anyway) consideration. It all focuses on “human hearted-ness”. Now, this idea was regarded as the highest of virtues, especially by Kung-fu-tzu (Confucius). To revere our human nature is something of a more wholesome attainment than righteousness and propriety and everything that we are conditioned to respect as ‘respectable’. Here’s the thing :

We all get so intent on ‘changing’ our behaviours – ‘fixing’, as it were, those aspects of ourselves that we (individually or as a society) see as shortcomings. As it usually turns out, we are deploring our own human inclinations – dumping them onto a ‘moral dung heap’ as though we haven’t any right or reason to desire, to resent, to act-out. We haven’t any tolerance with ourselves about our mistakes, our illusions or our laziness. We want to be outstanding …

That is so screwed-up.

It is not to say that we would not best cultivate the other virtues, those we regard as ‘good’, but to harbour a disdain for our human-ness, which is the foundation of it all, is detrimental to whatever else we may regard as upstanding. We have been very nicely trained to consider ‘human nature’ as a basically rotten thing. It isn’t … Human nature, to be clear, is a fundamentally good organisation.

As was said with a friend earlier today, “there is as much spirituality in being a bastard as in being all pious. Both have extremes which would be best avoided.”

Accordingly, those of us who attempt to be shining examples of virtuous righteousness become ‘the thieves of virtue’ (cf. Confucius). To try to be wholly righteous, thus against one’s true nature, is a vain attempt to go ‘beyond’ human. To me, and by all means I’m no authority, to brutishly bang away against nature, one’s own and that of the way things actually are – is about as close to “sin” as we actually get here.

There is a pun in Chinese that cannot be translated into other languages, but it is found that it works pretty well for us. ‘Tao’ means “the Way” but it also means “to speak”. Thus, the opening lines of the Tao Te Ching : “The Tao that can be told (followed/said) is not the true Tao” – this can be said that we cannot force/Force it. It follows, or perhaps leads, that : “The Force which can be Forced is not the true Force.”

So, if we, according to our nature, are coming up against resistance in ‘following the Force’, that really implies pretty clearly that we are trying to impose some generally accepted model of morality than truly following the Force.

 

Just something to ponder …

 

Respectfully submitted,

Alexandre Orion

Comments (7)

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WOW, very strong message.<br /><br />Strong in the sense that everyone is guilty of some alteration of their person in order to "fit in" with friend, family groups, or whatever.<br /><br />Your perspective is one that should make all Jedi take...

WOW, very strong message.<br /><br />Strong in the sense that everyone is guilty of some alteration of their person in order to "fit in" with friend, family groups, or whatever.<br /><br />Your perspective is one that should make all Jedi take much time to meditate on. To look for the true self and restore Our Own Balance, as we continue to help others restore theirs.<br /><br />Exceptional words for Spontaneous work.

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Bingo . . . human nature is bi-polarized. To me . . to know thyself. . .is to accept the poles, the opposite sides of the coin. I once heard it said "to have what you want you first have to have what you have" . . . .meaning to not deny or avoid...

Bingo . . . human nature is bi-polarized. To me . . to know thyself. . .is to accept the poles, the opposite sides of the coin. I once heard it said "to have what you want you first have to have what you have" . . . .meaning to not deny or avoid that about oneself that doesn't fit into the "perfect picture" we tend to accept for ourselves. Thanks Alex!

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This is exactly what I needed. Thank you, Alexandre. I agree that this is something that I need to deeply ponder.

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I often propose that honesty in all its facettes is a prime virtue, so I agree that one should never betray one's being for some delusion of righteousness. That being said, a path where no one goes will grow wild and be no path any longer. The...

I often propose that honesty in all its facettes is a prime virtue, so I agree that one should never betray one's being for some delusion of righteousness. That being said, a path where no one goes will grow wild and be no path any longer. The striving to be as good a version of oneself as possible is still a goal worth walking towards and I submit that to qualify a Jedi, this is a necessary condition, be it sufficient or not.

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Very, very well put.<br />Thank you for the sermon.<br />Contemplation, this is, when confronted with the will of the force in relation to self...

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Wow. Une fois de plus, merci. Sans rien imposer et sans rien de définitif, tes mots ont la justesse et la clarté d'un son de bol tibétain.

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Me gustó este sermón yo también pienso que ser un santurrón no significa que seas una persona más elevada, muchos maestros de varias religiones sus contemporaneos los vian como gente normal pese a sus grandes enseñanzas,eso entre otras cosas era...

Me gustó este sermón yo también pienso que ser un santurrón no significa que seas una persona más elevada, muchos maestros de varias religiones sus contemporaneos los vian como gente normal pese a sus grandes enseñanzas,eso entre otras cosas era lo que les hacía grandes.

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