[Science] Make no mistake, revenge is (bitter) sweet

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12 Jul 2016 17:07 #247930 by Jestor

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On walk-about...

Sith ain't Evil...
Jedi ain't Saints....


"Bake or bake not. There is no fry" - Sean Ching


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12 Jul 2016 18:18 #247946 by Rickie
But is revenge good or right? Just because it tastes good is it good for you? If it feels good is it good for you? We eat a lot of things that taste good and do lots of things that make us feel good, in the short term, but are destructive over time.

I'm craving a double cheese burger all of a sudden.

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12 Jul 2016 18:27 #247951 by den385
Revenge feels like a compulsion. It is sweet but the more you do revenge something, the more you get in some swampy downward spiral.

I did took my tiny revenges on people who, then, I though betrayed my trust. But it only strengthened the unhealthy bind, never made it healthy or dissolved it.

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13 Jul 2016 17:48 #248073 by OB1Shinobi
i think this is a lesson people have to learn on their own, mostly

if you feel the need for revenge then go get it, better to do what you think you need to do and then have to deal with the consequences and maybe learn from them, than not do what you think you should do because youre afraid to do it

if i should give a caution, what i have is this: "what aspect of your character do you have to draw on in order to commit this act and is that the part of yourself that needs to be fed for you to be a complete personality?"

People are complicated.
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13 Jul 2016 17:50 #248074 by rugadd
We are what we are and the only justice we sometimes can find is in our own two hands.

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14 Jul 2016 03:18 #248112 by den385
I don't think that revenge and justice are interchangeable...

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14 Jul 2016 17:59 #248168 by rugadd
Seeing the difference is sometimes difficult.

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14 Jul 2016 20:20 #248180 by TheDude
I agree with Rickie. Tons of things we consider bad are hard wired into us.
Take self harm for example. I'm sure nobody here strictly advocates people harm themselves, but the physiological effect of an endorphin release/neurochemical reaction which makes the individual physically feel good is undeniable.
That doesn't mean we necessarily self harm (I personally haven't), and it doesn't mean we necessarily seek out revenge, even if those things "feel good“ or inspire satisfaction or happiness.
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15 Jul 2016 16:20 #248225 by Alan
Humans exact revenge and our bodies appear to respond to the act with the production of endorphins or serotonin. The physiological production of such chemicals is an evolutionary adaptation and so I'd not apply any value statements. Sweet and good may be how we interpret what we feel, but within the context of our shared biology with other organisms, another, more primal adjective might be more appropriate, such as, the feeling of being safe from danger. For example, a friend of mine who hunts deer said that the way of the hunter is to disappear, to become part of the forest, so that the deer do not perceive danger, they 'feel safe' when returning to or entering the place of the hunter. This is also true of birdwatching. I walk to a place in the forest, stop and remain still and silent. Soon enough the birds who scattered when I arrived return because I (the human, the not-bird) has disappeared. Overly simplified, the evolutionary adaptation here is that animals who sense danger flee, and those who don't become food. So, I suggest replacing value statements like 'revenge makes one feel good' with 'revenge produces feelings of safety when the perceived threat is removed'.
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15 Jul 2016 17:14 #248228 by Rickie
I think in our distant primitive past revenge was a way to eliminate a foe that threatened our reproduction and our survival as a species. In modern society we still have our biological survival emotions. It takes maturity and self control to keep our beast a bay.

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